Tom Rossau

Tom Rossau is an autodidact designer who started a business in the basement of his parents’ house in Fårevejle, Denmark. When he first started out he used LEGO and everything else he could get his hands on to bring his designs to life, but it didn’t take long for him to develop a specific style that focused on leather. Tom created and sewed all his designs himself and in 1997, he opened a shop in Copenhagen.

Since 2004, Tom has primarily worked with natural wood veneer. To start off, his lamps were only available at his shop on Istedgade in Copenhagen, but in 2006 the TR4, TR5, TR6 and TR7 were introduced to the general public at Copenhagen’s Furniture Conference, where TR7 was voted the Audience Favourite.

Browse Tom Rosseau’s lovely lamps below.

Tom Rossau lamps

In 2004, wood veneer infiltrated the design scene and changed the game forever. In the beginning, wood veneer lamps were only available in Rossau’s physical shop on Istedgade in Copenhagen but starting in 2006 - when TR4-TR7 were launched at Copenhagen Furniture Fair - something happened. It didn’t hurt that TR7 was given the "Audience Favourite Award".

Although Tom Rossau has grown significantly in recent years the company has retained its focus on its core values, which can be boiled down to one word: design.
Thanks to its annual exhibitions at IMM Köln and Northern Light Fair in Stockholm, the number of retailers working with Tom Rosseau grows steadily. The company’s portfolio has continued to grow over the years and now consists of shelves, combined coffee/dining tables, and a wide range of new lamps.

A growing company that keeps its original values in focus


In Tom Rosseau’s own words:
“The design process is a self-centred one. The end user might have their needs met by the product, but to be honest, for me it’s all about the kick I get out of it. It’s exciting to get an idea to then have the chance to work with it and lose yourself in the details from previous sketches and prototypes. Carrying it all through to production is a fascinating process.

“Then there’s the magical experience of materials calculated for use in a prototype going completely haywire and revealing unintended qualities. That gives me the chance to dive into the opportunities presented by the product and really explore its potential. I find inspiration in everything, but the process, where limitations and potential start to gain some definition, is an experience in and of itself.

“In most cases, it proves a good idea to refer to the material itself when consulting the designer. That makes me a helping hand to fetch screws and assembling loose ends…

“The keystones of functionality, sustainability, and energy consumption make the process even more exciting. There’s something amazing about meeting your end consumer’s demands, but at the end of the day, I’m a big fan of random discoveries, as they keep the playful element of (good) design alive.”